Investigating the UoPX and What You Should Know

Sequim, Washington 1 comment

If you are considering the University of Phoenix in your future plans, I am here to give fair warning before you make a mistake that will affect the rest of your life. This is what I discovered about the University of Phoenix (UoPX).

UoPX is a for-profit institution of higher learning. It is a wholly owned subsidiary of Apollo Group Inc. which is publicly traded (NASDAQ: APOL), an S&P 500 corporation based in Phoenix, Arizona.

In 2010, UoPX came under government scrutiny after its Phoenix and Philadelphia campuses were found to have been engaging in deceptive enrollment practices and fraudulent solicitation of FAFSA funds. In 2009, the University of Phoenix settled a lawsuit brought on by two whistle blowers assisted by the federal government. The company settled for $78.5 million dollars, including $11 million in lawyer fees due to allegations of unethical/fraudulent recruitment practices. Check this website for the whole story: http://dailycensored.com/2009/12/18/university-of-phoenix-settles-fraud-complaint-for-78-5-million/.

In 2004, the Department of Education alleged UoPX had violated the Higher Education Act which prohibits offering financial incentives to admission representatives.

According to an article in the NY Times 2007; the Department of Education reported UoPX had an overall graduation rate of 16% and a 4% rate for its online programs. Compared to other universities, the national average was 55%.

I highly recommend you also visit this website: http://www.consumeraffairs.com/education/phoenix.html#ixzz0ZtLg8sOh. There must be hundreds of complaints posted in just 2011 alone.

Lastly, here are a couple quotes from http://www.ripoffreport.com/colleges-and-universities/university-of-phoeni/university-of-phoenix-huge-rip-63f46.htm Report: #212046:

"Before I took my first class at UOP, I called University of Arizona and asked if UOP credit would transfer. The lady almost laughed in my ear and said, ''no, definitely not'' (this was several years ago)."

"CAN'T GET A JOB WITH UOP DIPLOMA? I can't believe some guy was trying to get a job in finance on a UOP diploma."

"You know something's wrong when UOP staff can't even tell you whether or not UOP credit will transfer to MAJOR universities IN THE SAME METRO AREA! That should have red lights and sirens going off in your heads people!!"

Review about: Uopx.

Comments

Anonymous
Ridgefield, Connecticut, United States #938357

In December 2014, I self-published a book called, “Online Education Fraud: The Diary of a Short Seller.” The book recounts part of my 20 year career in the investment business.I spent 15 years hunting and exposing fraud at for-profit schools, primarily University of Phoenix (UOP).

There are new books on the market talking about the student loan bubble, which has become newsworthy recently, and a book or two about online fraud. My book is unique because I was very active in participating in the downfall of the industry. As you’ll read, I went from analyst to activist and a highly aggressive one at that. The book is sizzling with controversy and evidence of fraud.

I have tape recorded interviews with former employees alleging fraud. I met with SEC investigators, DOJ investigators, and several other senior officials. I was quoted in several major newspapers, recognized as an expert. The book is also a good teaching tool for those interested in the stock market.

The book starts in 1998 with Computer Learning Centers (CLCX). The company was caught violating federal rules around a ban on commission sales. Using my evidence, the government raided the headquarters finding large quantities of documentation detailing the massive fraud. The company was caught shredding documents before investigators arrived.

The Dept. of Education put them out of business by imposing a large fine. The second section of the book covers the history between 2001 and...

The rest of the book covers the 2009/2010 period in which one ambitious Department of Education employee and I teamed up to hunt the sector. The questions we raised and the evidence we found often fell on deaf ears. Finally, in 2009 Obama appointed an Undersecretary of Education who knew about the fraud.

He went after the industry, nearly destroying it.

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